Strategies
  • Students will analyze the verses of the song and discuss the implications of the song's meaning within their assigned groups. Students will then come together as a whole class and share their thoughts on their interpretation of the song.
  • Students should define unfamiliar words with in the song.
  • Students should think about who is being referred to as a Yankee.
  • Students should think about the emotions the British soldiers could have felt while singing the song and impact the song could have made on the America military men.
  • Students should determine if the song is relevant to the time period of the American Revolution


  • The song was originally sung by the British side to mock Americans, however the Americans took ownership of the song and began to sing it themselves, to turn the intended put-down into a source of pride after, though outnumbered, they managed to turn the British back at Lexington and Concord.







http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/symbols/yankee.html (best site)

http://www.contemplator.com/america/ydoodle.html


Yankee Doodle
Thinkquest

**//Yankee Doodle//** was a song made by a British man named Richard Shuckburg to make fun of the Colonists. Unfortunately for him, the Americans loved the song and so they made the British dance to it by 1781. When the British man wrote "He stuck a feather in his hat and called it Macaroni" meant that Americans were stupid and thought that a feather was macaroni. Macaroni isn't that kind that we eat: it was a hair style in England. Doodle meant "a foolish person." Yankee was a nick-name for New Englanders. The original tune for Yankee Doodle was Lydia Fisher's Jig with these words: "Lucy Locket lost her pocket, Kitty Fisher found it; Nothing in it, nothing on it, But the binding 'round it.

Lyrics


1: Father and I went down to camp
Along with Captain Gooding
And there we saw the men and boys
As thick as hasty pudding.

2: Chorus
Yankee doodle, keep it up
Yankee doodle dandy
Mind the music and the step
And with the girls be handy.

3: There was Captain Washington
Upon a slapping stallion
A-giving orders to his men
I guess there was a million.

Chorus

4: And then the feathers on his hat
They looked so' tarnal fin-a
I wanted pockily to get
To give to my Jemima.

Chorus

5: And then we saw a swamping gun
Large as a log of maple
Upon a deuced little cart
A load for father's cattle.

Chorus

6: And every time they shoot it off
It takes a horn of powder
It makes a noise like father's gun
Only a nation louder.

Chorus

7: I went as nigh to one myself
As' Siah's underpinning
And father went as nigh agin
I thought the deuce was in him.
We saw a little barrel, too
The heads were made of leather
They knocked upon it with little clubs
And called the folks together.

Other Verses:

Chorus

8: And there they'd fife away like fun
And play on cornstalk fiddles
And some had ribbons red as blood
All bound around their middles.
The troopers, too, would gallop up
And fire right in our faces
It scared me almost to death
To see them run such races.

Chorus

9: Uncle Sam came there to change
Some pancakes and some onions
For' lasses cake to carry home
To give his wife and young ones.

Chorus

10: But I can't tell half I see
They kept up such a smother
So I took my hat off, made a bow
And scampered home to mother.

Chorus

11: Cousin Simon grew so bold
I thought he would have cocked it
It scared me so I streaked it off
And hung by father's pocket.

Chorus

12: And there I saw a pumpkin shell
As big as mother's basin
And every time they touched it off
They scampered like the nation.



13: And there was Captain Washington,
With gentlefolks about him,
They say he's gown so 'tarnal proud
He will not ride without them.

Chorus

14: There came Gen'ral Washington
Upon a snow-white charger
He looked as big as all outdoors
And thought that he was larger.

Chorus